Efik Marriage “Knocking” Ceremony - Mbub Ndo K’ido Efik


I recently attended the Mbub (literally translated “asking”) of a close relative. It was my first time observing the activities in an Efik Mbub. I was expecting a small, intimate affair with only the two families involved but it turned out to be very elaborate. A Lot of guests. Affang and fufu very plenty. Enough drinks.

We even had an official Ofiori Ndo, a presenter or M.C, who usually presides over activities at Efik traditional marriages (Ndo Efik). The Ofiori Ndo is very important. He (or she) must be well versed in Efik traditional practices and the language. The success of the ceremony depends on the ability of the Ofiori Ndo to keep the guests entertained for the duration of the event.

The Ofiori Ndo at the Mbub didn’t disappoint. She was funny and upbeat as she introduced the two families and directed the introduction rituals. After the groom-to-be formally declared his intent, the blushing bride-to-be was ushered in by a group of women to sit with her future husband. She was all demure as the Ofiori Ndo teased her in front of the crowd.

Drinks for the bride’s family were presented in two Efik brass trays (akpangkpang). When the Ofiori Ndo called for the drinks, two maidens walked in with the trays balanced delicately on their heads. The trays were then set before the bride’s family. Its contents is usually a mixture of soft drinks, wines and spirits. It’s also used for presentation of drinks in Efik traditional marriages.

Efik Brass Tray, Akpangkpang, with some drinks to be presented to the bride's family
The akpangkpang is a rarity nowadays. Not every household can afford it. It can only be found in the houses of a few prominent royal families who put it up for hire to people that need them for their events.

Contents in the tray are always covered before presenting

Normally, the groom is presented with a list of all the drinks that are required for the Mbub. I was able to get a generic list to post here.


Like I mentioned, this is just a generic list. It could change depending on the family involved and the groom’s family influence/affluence. Also, this list is just for the Mbub. The traditional marriage list (Nkpo Ndo K'ido Efik) comes with its own set of rites and “gifts.” However, the Efik “bride-price” is a standard £12 (bon duopeba). 

The amount was set in pounds because of our colonial influence. It was converted to 24 at the time. Big money then! Now, to avoid inconsistencies, it’s better to just get the pounds instead of trying to convert to naira as the exchange rate could become a point of argument.  
5 comments on "Efik Marriage “Knocking” Ceremony - Mbub Ndo K’ido Efik"
  1. I like all this cultural consciousness vibe thing going on at this blog, beauty food wellness c🙌✊

    ReplyDelete
  2. £12 ? Even after all this time? Impressive write up as usual. Kudos

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  3. Lol not taking into account inflation and whatnot :-)

    Well written and detailed post.

    Thank you for enlightening us

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  4. I love Efik culture anytime, anyday. So rich and unique! But then I would be biased cos I am Efik. :)

    I remember my sister's husband was so excited about getting married he actually gave a £20 as his wife's bride price instead of the requested "bon duopeba" or N24. He got chastised seriously by the elders at the table and ''ibuot ufok' and was reminded that bride price was bon dupeba. :)

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  5. I love Efik culture anytime, anyday. So rich and unique! But then I would be biased cos I am Efik. :)

    I remember my sister's husband was so excited about getting married he actually gave a £20 note (in an envelope) as his wife's bride price instead of the requested "bon duopeba" or N24. He got chastised seriously by the elders at the table and ''ibuot ufok' and was reminded that bride price was bon dupeba. :)

    ReplyDelete

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